Sous Vide Time and Temperature Charts

Welcome to the Amazing Food Made Easy sous vide time and temperature charts. To view the recommended cooking suggestions for an item just select it from the menu below. You can also view all the sous vide time and temperatures.

What Would You Like to Sous Vide?

How to Sous Vide Fruits and Vegetables

Sous vide fruits and sous vide vegetables have much more leeway in the timing compared to traditional methods.

Note: For a more detailed look at cooking fruits and vegetables, I highly recommend reading my article on How to Sous Vide Vegetables and Fruits.

Sous vide turnips miso glazed top

Almost all sous vide vegetables are cooked at 183°F (83.9°C) or higher and all entries below assume that temperature, unless otherwise stated. Hotter temperatures will cook the vegetables more quickly, but they will basically have the same texture at the end. There is also a lot of variability in a specific type of vegetable, with both their ripeness, variety, and size having an impact. So sous vide times can vary across vegetables, even of the same type.

Why are Vegetables Cooked at Such a High Temperature?

The International Sous Vide Association (ISVA) has been hosting monthly "Showcases". These are deep dives presented by multiple home and professional cooks on a variety of sous vide cooking topics. The following article captures Jason's discussion on Sous Viding Vegetables from their ISVA Meatless Showcase.

I wanted to talk about something that not only was briefly mentioned earlier, but is also a question that comes up in a lot of the Facebook groups, "Why are vegetables cooked at such a high temperature?" The basic answer is because they don't really tenderize at lower temperatures.

I threw some carrots in the sous vide bath at 150°F (65.6°C) at 7:00 this morning. I just pulled them out right before the showcase started. So these have been cooking for about 7 hours at 150°F (65.6°C).

The carrot is still very, very crunchy when you bite into it. You can also still hear some of that good crispy crunch. So after 7 hours at 150°F (65.6°C), these carrots were still very crunchy and almost raw tasting.

They don't really tenderize quickly at all. You need those high temperatures in order to break vegetables down and start to allow the different components to tenderize and to become something that we generally consider cooked.

When I went to CREA they talked about the different components of the vegetables and some of them start to breakdown, very, very slowly at these temperatures. This doesn't taste raw, but it's pretty close.

Sous vide cherry tomatoes poached 1

I like 170°F (76.6°C), 180°F (82.2°C). They start to break down more quickly and you're going to have a more, it's going to taste cooked, but not like a traditional steamed or boiled vegetable.

And then once you get above 183°F (83.9°C) other things start breaking down and above 185°F (85°C), everything starts breaking down.

So, if you cook your vegetables between 183°F (83.9°C) and 185°F (85°C), you kind of get this magic mix where they're tender but still have good bite to them. They are also still not mushy, not fall apart, or not squishy, which is why I've really been enjoying sous vide carrots lately at 183°F (83.9°C), 184°F (84.4°C). They're amazing to eat at that temperature.

Sous vide root vegetables 5

The higher you set the temperature above 185°F (85°C), the faster it cooks. So a lot of people will do 190°F (87.8°C), 195°F (90.6°C) because you reduce some of the cook time for tenderizing it.

So it's just something to keep in mind as you're doing vegetables. That's why you need to do a higher temperature and why you can't do vegetables and meat at the same time because you really don't want meat cooked at 190°F (87.8°C), 195°F (90.6°C) unless you're using a pressure cooker.

I believe Patty Whysman mentioned earlier in the comments that she likes to cook the vegetables ahead of time, cool them off and chill them. And then she reheats them when the steaks are done the next day. It's a great way to do it and something that I've done before.

Your vegetables will store in the sous vide bags in the refrigerator for a week or two, which is great. Then when I pull the steaks out of the sous vide bath, I'll throw the vegetables in the same water. And by the time the steaks are seared, the vegetables have been reheated.

Sous vide root vegetables 1

If you're doing more complicated dishes, Stefan Boer from StefanGourmet does this. When he is doing Italian classics, he will make a Ragu sauce and cook all the vegetables in the sauce ahead of time and cool it off.

Stefan then seals the sauce with the meat and sous vides that long-term. At the lower meat temperature, the vegetables can break down a little bit. It doesn't matter because the vegetables have already been cooked and they're already ready to go.

So that's a few approaches to cooking vegetables.

Just remember, you can't really throw the meat and raw vegetables all in at 135°F (57.2°C), because the vegetables will never be tender. You will end up with a kind of warmish, raw tasting vegetables that aren't going to be very good.

So I wanted to talk about this because it's something that comes up a lot, people are curious about it, and after all, this is a Sous Vide Meatless Showcase!

New to Sous Vide?

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Sous Vide Fruits and Vegetables Temperatures and Times

Acorn Squash

acorn-squash

Apples

apples

Artichokes

Asparagus

asparagus

Banana

Beets

beet

Broccoli

broccoli

Brussels Sprouts

brussels-sprouts

Butternut Squash

butternut-squash

Cabbage

Carrot

carrot

Cauliflower

cauliflower

  • Cauliflower: 183ºF for 20 to 40 Minutes (83.9ºC)
  • For Puree: 183ºF for 60 Minutes (83.9ºC)
  • Stems: 183ºF for 60 to 75 Minutes (83.9ºC)
  • How to sous vide cauliflower

Celery Root

Chard

Cherries

cherries

Corn

corn

Eggplant

Fennel

fennel

Garlic

Golden Beets

Green Beans

green-beans

Leek

leek

Onion

onion

Parsnip

parsnip

Pea Pods

pea-pods

Peaches

peaches

Pears

pears

Pineapple

pineapple

Plums

Potatoes

potatos

Pumpkin

pumpkin

Radish

radish

Rhubarb

Rutabaga

Salsify

Squash, Summer

Squash, Winter

squash-winter

Sunchokes

Sweet Potatoes

sweet-potatoes

Swiss Chard

Tomato

tomato

Turnip

turnip

Yams

yams

Zucchini

zucchini

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